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The Marin School Weekly Update for Friday, October 23rd

Stay on top of announcements, current events, photos and more! Check back each week for another installment of The Marin School Weekly newsletter. Read this week's newsletter Want to get your copy straight to your inbox? Click here to subscribe! ​​

Braiiiinz: a dissection. Just in time for Halloween! (Warning, photos of actual brains)

TMS Biology teacher Heather Parker joined Fred Kral's Psychology class to lead a sheep brain dissection lab. Did you know, the sheep brain and human brain are very similar in overall structure (as are all mammalian brains). However, a sheep's brain is about about one-tenth of the weight of an adult human brain. A major difference is that the relative size of the frontal lobe—an indicator of species intelligence—is much smaller in sheep than humans. Though the sheep has generally been regarded as an unintelligent animal, it is increasingly recognized that sheep are able to perform some advanced tasks, such as remembering the faces of other sheep and humans for two years or longer.

Visual and Performing Arts at TMS

Delve deeper into the day-to-day projects and programs that make up The Marin School's Visual and Performing Arts. The arts are a critical component of The Marin School’s mission to celebrate each student’s unique gifts. At TMS, students can engage in a variety of creative pursuits, including studio art, theatre, jazz, studio recording, sculpture, digital fabrication technologies, photography, 3D animation, and digital art. Our students receive sophisticated training in technique, and develop creative means of personal expression. Our arts faculty are professionals in their fields, guiding students interested in the arts in planning for higher education and careers. The TMS Arts blog will f

Cellular Structure of Celery

Bio students have been studying cell anatomy and learning about each organelle in eukaryotic cells. In this lab, they looked at the mitochondria of celery under the microscope after adding sucrose solution and then adding a dye that is only colored when in an oxidized state. It in effect stains only the mitochondria while it is breaking down the sucrose to make energy in the form of ATP. Students were also able to see other organelles they student recently, such as chloroplasts and nuclei.

Zoology considers the Albatross

Zoology students have been studying albatross, including their wingspan (the largest of any bird), their life cycle, adaptations to their environment, and their food web. They also also learned how to plot actual data from satellite tags on birds to determine how far they traveled, where they went, and based on their life cycle made hypotheses about why they may have traveled where they did. For instance, if they stayed close to the Hawaiian Islands, they were likely feeding a chick, where as if they went to California or Japan, they were likely looking for food for themselves. More recently, Zoology students studied bathymetry and some features found under the ocean surface, and are now go

TMS Weekly Update 10/10/15

Stay on top of announcements, current events, photos and more! Check back each week for another installment of The Marin School Weekly newsletter. Read this week's newsletter Want to get your copy straight to your inbox? Click here to subscribe!

The Marin School Weekly Update 10/3/15

Stay on top of announcements, current events, photos and more! Check back each week for another installment of The Marin School Weekly newsletter. Read this week's newsletter Want to get your copy straight to your inbox? Click here to subscribe!

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